Beginnings, culture, Getting settled, vocation

Thank God for Frank conversations

Coming from Oregon, no one is going to have any sympathy for a person who is living and working in the Caribbean.  If they do, it is a stretch.  From Oregon, it all looks like an island oasis with beaches and fun for days and days.

islca15_2
a mental image of “the Caribbean”

The “grass is always greener” syndrome.

So, to speak to teachers here who acknowledge that all sun, no green, no trees, mountains, rivers or bracing Oregon Beaches where children wear parkas over their bathing suits… gets old.  It’s not home.  No one knows your heart.  No one knows to trust you.  Most all the familiars are elsewhere.  Only Ella Fitzgerald and ones own clothes are the same as before.  What is abundant are new challenges, overwhelming situations and patient, persistent problem solving.

12-reasons-the-oregon-coast-is-even-more-fun-than-disneyland-11-600x401.jpg
A hoodie or a full on winter coat is pretty normal on home beaches in Oregon.

But like I said before:  no one is going to have any sympathy for a person who is living and working in the Caribbean.  So the one option remaining, as it always is:  get above it.

Teaching overseas is alternately an education like no other, an unforgettable life experience, an incredibly uncomfortable stretch that leaves one, at least at first, longing to return to the land of comfort and familiarity.  But it is also a bug that bites you and makes a great many other things seem mundane, ordinary and not quite as interesting.

Those who have lived and worked overseas know that even the most idyllic place will wear thin.   I was drawn to this because of the challenge it presented in ways I want to be challenged, but it doesn’t mean that there isn’t self-doubt, fatigue, wondering if or how challenges will be met.

3586216327_df8f43d127
the kids are often the reason at the end of the day, the most unforgettable part of working overseas.

But…no one is going to have sympathy for a person who is living and working in the Caribbean.

This week I might have been able to get above the a sense of having my back up against a wall.  Starting off irritated Monday, around Tuesday I realized that walking around feeling overwhelmed, exasperated or whatever other negative thoughts I had been entertaining for the past week would not create success and that I had to get over it–and get on top of it.

So that was this week.

Because…no one is going to have any sympathy for a person who is living and working in the Caribbean.

1 thought on “Thank God for Frank conversations”

  1. I love this! Truth and honesty.
    We moved to Central Oregon (not exactly like the Caribbean) but away from friends and family, and all things familiar. We wanted this and love it here AND it is tough at times. I get your words at least a little bit. Thank you for sharing!!! ❤

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s